Passing on Philanthropy: Teaching the Next Generating to Care

Passing On Philanthropy_Lazar Finker

Today, being aware of the world around us and finding ways to help other people is easier than ever, but many people remain oblivious to ways they can participate in philanthropy throughout their lives. To truly pass on the values of philanthropy, we need to teach youth to care for others from a young age. The more young people are exposed to philanthropy and the importance of helping others, the more likely it is that these values will be instilled in them and remain present throughout their lives.

Make it a normal part of life

If you want youth to truly value philanthropy, you need to make it something they recognize as part of their lives. Parents should have a conversation with kids when they’re young and explain what philanthropy is, then begin getting them involved with simple opportunities where they can begin experiencing what it means to give back. Take used clothes to a charity, donate food, or have them save up some money to give to a charity of their choosing. It is up to parents to find child-friendly opportunities, but the foundation is out there. Showing kids the little ways they can be philanthropic will help them make giving a habit.

Teach lessons about philanthropy

After explaining philanthropy and sharing ways to participate in it, give deeper explanations to your children and teach them lessons about the different issues that nonprofit organizations help to address. Explain that there are people in the world who need help with lots of different issues and that it falls to these organizations to help them out, which can be done in various ways. Teach them to be thankful that your family is in a position to be philanthropic and educate them on different events and causes they can focus their philanthropy on.

Set a positive example

If you want your child to understand philanthropy, you need to get them involved. The best way to accomplish this goal is by taking them with you to volunteer or do something philanthropic. Make these activities a regular part of their young lives and they will soon be the norm to them. As they see you being philanthropic in daily activities, they’ll feel inspired to do the same and consider philanthropy a part of family life rather than an activity only done on occasion.

Let them take the lead

Once you feel that your child is old enough to make good decisions or volunteer on their own, let them take the lead. Ask them where they’d like to volunteer and what they feel passionate about, then either encourage their interests and take them to volunteer for that organization or even go with them and make it a family event. If your child thinks of new ways to work on their philanthropic pursuits, support their ideas and work with them to accomplish this goal.

How Nonprofits Can Leverage Social Media

How Nonprofits Can Leverage Social Media—Lazar Finker

Changes in how information is spread have forced nonprofits to adapt or fall behind. To that end, may of these organizations have tried to create strong brands for themselves online, an endeavor which requires the creation of social media accounts and consistent delivery of content. There’s an audience for every cause; but not all nonprofits are created equal when it comes to generating support through social media.

With this in mind, I’d like to discuss a few of the factors to consider when running a social media account as a nonprofit.

What do you want to achieve?

Social media is an effective tool, but it’s not enough to just start an account and expect followers to come out of the woodwork. Before a nonprofit creates social media properties, it should consider the possible outcomes of their campaign and determine what they’re hoping to achieve. Part of this involves defining an audience; they will inevitably play a role in an organization’s outcomes and should be considered carefully.

Conducting surveys and crafting personas are both solid first steps when it comes to defining an audience; and segmenting it as much as possible can create a few different angles to consider when creating content.

What value do you provide through social media?

Once an audience has been established, nonprofits will need to consider methods to properly engage with them. Often, nonprofits will opt to establish themselves as authoritative figures in their subject of choice by crafting original content. This approach is the most useful for establishing brand recognition for a certain nonprofit and education, as it gives an organization control over the message they are sending.

Alternatively, a nonprofit can become a curator of content in their field of choice, a similar approach that allows for easy sharing of news and establishing relationships with other organizations. Lastly, nonprofits can use social media as a platform for bringing their community together, promoting an exchange of ideas and creating passion for the cause.

Really, all three of these have merit, and a balance of the three depending on objectives is the best way to provide value to an audience.

How do you deliver good content?

Part of prompting engagement and raising a strong audience is delivering solid content to stakeholders. Content should be regular, match an organization’s voice and brand, and, perhaps most importantly, be authentic. Don’t go into a social media endeavor with the open intent of leveraging an audience to accomplish something; provide them with answers, engage frequently, and help them as much as you can. This will keep followers coming back and make them more likely to spread the word on their own volition.

Additionally, organizations should ensure that anything posted is of solid quality; paying for stock images or leveraging existing video of charitable efforts can create interesting, visually-dynamic updates.

What to do with an active audience?

In the best case scenario, all a nonprofit need to do to turn a social media following into capital is ask for donations.

This is, however, only practical with an active and engaged following. For that matter, it helps if a nonprofit has an objective that they’re looking to accomplish; involving social media followers as closely as possible is great for generating further engagement.

In many ways, working with social media followers is fairly close to working with potential customers in a for-profit business. Measuring each step of the process is crucial, and involves monitoring outreach activity, page traffic, conversion rates, and retention rates. It’s all about building a relationship that works two ways, and although nonprofits seldom have time to interact with each and every social media follower, they can still be responsive and prolific enough to make meaningful connections through various networks.

Home for the Holidays—Finker-Frenkel Legacy Foundation Gives Back to Children’s Home

Home For the Holidays—Lazar Finker

Recently, a contribution from the Finker-Frenkel Legacy Foundation was able to fund a Hanukkah party for the Beit Chaya children’s home in Moscow! Raissa and I are happy to continue to support the Solomon Jewish Community Center and see the impact that our donations have made. See the full presentation here.

Beit-Chaya3 Lazar Finker

Beit-Chaya4 Lazar Finker Beit-Chaya2 Lazar Finker Beit-Chaya1 Lazar Finker

Finker-Frenkel Legacy Foundation Gives Back to Children’s Home

Giving Back—Finker-Frenkel Legacy Foundation Donates to Children's Home

Dr. Lazar Finker and his wife, Dr. Raissa Frenkel, have always been passionate about giving back to the community, whether locally or half a world away. Their organization, the Finker-Frenkel Legacy Foundation, is committed to making an impact by supporting causes in multiple fields such as medical research, education, religious development, and children’s welfare.

With this in mind, the Foundation’s donation to Solomon, a Jewish Community Center in Moscow, is logical, given the couple’s heritage and previous charity work with other Jewish organizations. The funds that they provided went toward providing repairs, food, and clothing to Beit Chaya, a Jewish children’s home.

Beit Chaya Children's Home

With the contribution, Beit Chaya was able to renovate an entire floor of rooms and help give orphaned children a better life. Solomon recently contacted the Foundation with news on how its donations had improved the facilities, including pictures of the updated home and a bio on one of the many children that reside there.

Beit Chaya Children's Home

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Residents of Beit Chaya

The floor that the Finker-Frenkel Foundation improved is home to younger residents, including Artem, a four-year-old whose life has been touched by the home.

Artem, a child living at Beit Chaya

After spending his first few years locked in an apartment with his alcoholic mother, Artem found a home at the Beit Chaya, and has now become much more open to exploring its hallways and interacting with others. It is Raissa and Lazar’s sincere hope that other children like Artem can find happiness with the help of philanthropy.

The couple, along with the rest of the Foundation, is excited to continue to support their home country of Russia and to see what positive change can come about as a result of their giving.