How Nonprofits Can Leverage Social Media

How Nonprofits Can Leverage Social Media—Lazar Finker

Changes in how information is spread have forced nonprofits to adapt or fall behind. To that end, may of these organizations have tried to create strong brands for themselves online, an endeavor which requires the creation of social media accounts and consistent delivery of content. There’s an audience for every cause; but not all nonprofits are created equal when it comes to generating support through social media.

With this in mind, I’d like to discuss a few of the factors to consider when running a social media account as a nonprofit.

What do you want to achieve?

Social media is an effective tool, but it’s not enough to just start an account and expect followers to come out of the woodwork. Before a nonprofit creates social media properties, it should consider the possible outcomes of their campaign and determine what they’re hoping to achieve. Part of this involves defining an audience; they will inevitably play a role in an organization’s outcomes and should be considered carefully.

Conducting surveys and crafting personas are both solid first steps when it comes to defining an audience; and segmenting it as much as possible can create a few different angles to consider when creating content.

What value do you provide through social media?

Once an audience has been established, nonprofits will need to consider methods to properly engage with them. Often, nonprofits will opt to establish themselves as authoritative figures in their subject of choice by crafting original content. This approach is the most useful for establishing brand recognition for a certain nonprofit and education, as it gives an organization control over the message they are sending.

Alternatively, a nonprofit can become a curator of content in their field of choice, a similar approach that allows for easy sharing of news and establishing relationships with other organizations. Lastly, nonprofits can use social media as a platform for bringing their community together, promoting an exchange of ideas and creating passion for the cause.

Really, all three of these have merit, and a balance of the three depending on objectives is the best way to provide value to an audience.

How do you deliver good content?

Part of prompting engagement and raising a strong audience is delivering solid content to stakeholders. Content should be regular, match an organization’s voice and brand, and, perhaps most importantly, be authentic. Don’t go into a social media endeavor with the open intent of leveraging an audience to accomplish something; provide them with answers, engage frequently, and help them as much as you can. This will keep followers coming back and make them more likely to spread the word on their own volition.

Additionally, organizations should ensure that anything posted is of solid quality; paying for stock images or leveraging existing video of charitable efforts can create interesting, visually-dynamic updates.

What to do with an active audience?

In the best case scenario, all a nonprofit need to do to turn a social media following into capital is ask for donations.

This is, however, only practical with an active and engaged following. For that matter, it helps if a nonprofit has an objective that they’re looking to accomplish; involving social media followers as closely as possible is great for generating further engagement.

In many ways, working with social media followers is fairly close to working with potential customers in a for-profit business. Measuring each step of the process is crucial, and involves monitoring outreach activity, page traffic, conversion rates, and retention rates. It’s all about building a relationship that works two ways, and although nonprofits seldom have time to interact with each and every social media follower, they can still be responsive and prolific enough to make meaningful connections through various networks.